Opiate Use Disorder Treatment

(Suboxone)

Breaking the cycle of opiate abuse and/or opiate addiction is made easier with medication-assisted treatment. Advances in science have made this process much safer, less painful and more successful.

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. Research shows that a combination of medication and therapy can successfully treat these disorders, and for some people struggling with addiction, MAT can help sustain recovery

Suboxone Treatment FAQ

We can now offer our patients who are looking to withdraw from opiates the use of Suboxone, a medication that assists in stopping withdrawal symptoms from opiate drugs such as Vicodin, heroin, codeine, morphine, fentanyl, and OxyContin.  We assess the client’s need for Suboxone and determine the appropriate course of treatment.

 

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone® C-III (buprenorphine HCI/naloxone HCI dehydrate sublingual tablets) is a medicine that, together with counseling, is approved to treat opioid dependence. 

Suboxone minimizes withdrawal symptoms, decreases cravings, and partially blocks the effects of other opioids.

How Does Treatment with Suboxone Work?

Suboxone (buprenophine) attaches to opioid receptors and partially blocks the effects of other opioids.  What makes Suboxone (buprenophine) unique and valuable in addiction treatment is that it is a partial agonist. With daily maintenance doses, Suboxone (buprenophine) assists in keeping the brain’s opioid receptors occupied to help reduce cravings, withdrawal symptoms and block the effects of other opioids.

 

How Does Suboxone Help Patients?

When Suboxone (buprenophine) moves onto the opioid receptors in a dependent patient’s brain, it does three important things.

  • First, by binding to the brain’s opioid receptors, Suboxone satisfies the dependent person’s need for an opioid. This suppresses withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings.

  • Second, Suboxone sticks to the brain’s receptors so that other opioids have great difficulty attaching, and it remains on the receptors for several days.

  • Finally, although all opioids lower breathing, when Suboxone is taken alone and as directed, it has an upper limit on how much it does this. This limitation is because buprenorphine is a partial agonist.

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NA and/or AA support is paramount to long term sobriety.

ADDRESS 

230 East Avenue, Cedartown, GA 30125 

TEL     770-749-0420

FAX     770-748-0508

EMAIL     staff@genmedga.com

CLINIC HOURS

Monday - Thursday: 9-5

Friday: 9-12

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